A-T IN LATIN AMERICA

The A-T Children’s Project is funding Beatriz Tavares Costa-Carvalho, MD and her colleagues to learn more about A-T in the Latin American population with a new grant entitled Ataxia-Telangiectasia: Epidemiological Survey in Latin America. Studying how a disease affects people over time is important not just to understanding the nature of the disease and its … Read More

INFLAMMATION, SWALLOWING, AND AGING IN A-T

Sharon McGrath-Morrow, a pediatric pulmonologist, published results showing that higher levels of IL-6 and IL-8 in the blood, markers for inflammation, are associated with poorer lung function in people with A-T, suggesting a link between inflammation and lung decline in this disease. Maureen Lefton-Greif, a speech and swallowing specialist, published results demonstrating abnormal coupling of … Read More

A-T CLINICAL EXPERTS MEET IN POLAND

From October 6-8, clinicians, therapists and scientists gathered in Warsaw, Poland for the 2016 A-T Clinical Research Conference to discuss ways to improve the care for individuals with A-T. Highlights from the meeting included: An update on the CATNAP Study, a large pediatric neuroimaging study being performed in the UK and co-funded by the A-T … Read More

EXAMINING LUNG BACTERIA IN A-T

Because more than 25% of patients with ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) develop some form of chronic lung disease, the A-T Children’s Project has awarded a fellowship grant to Abrey Yeo, PhD in Australia to examine the mixture of bacteria found in the airways of individuals with A-T. Even healthy people have numerous types of bacteria in their … Read More

TESTING DRUGS TO PROTECT A-T BRAIN CELLS FROM DNA DAMAGE

Many drugs now taken by millions of people were discovered by high-throughput drug screening, a process in which scientists use robotics, data processing and control software, liquid handling devices and sensitive detectors to quickly perform millions of chemical tests until they find compounds that correct a biomolecular pathway that scientists believe is relevant to a … Read More

GROWING A-T BRAIN CELLS IN A DISH

With funding from the A-T Children’s Project, the laboratory of Anthony Wynshaw-Boris, MD, PhD at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio will attempt to grow A-T brain cells in laboratory dishes to overcome the obstacle of not being able to access and study living brain cells from A-T patients. Dr. Wynshaw-Boris knows A-T well. … Read More

CAREER A-T RESEARCHER FOCUSES ON BRAIN

With a multi-year grant award from the A-T Children’s Project, Yossi Shiloh, PhD from Tel Aviv University in Israel will now turn much of his laboratory’s focus toward how the loss of the A-T protein causes brain cells to die in people with A-T. Dr. Shiloh first met children with A-T when he was a … Read More

CORRECTING CELL METABOLISM IN A-T

Scientists have known for a long time that skin and blood cells obtained from A-T patients do not survive as well as cells from healthy people, and recent discoveries have hinted that A-T cells, especially brain cells in A-T patients, may be dying because of defective cell metabolism. The A-T Children’s Project has therefore funded … Read More

EXPANDING MRI IMAGING FOR A-T BEYOND THE BRAIN TO LUNGS

Recently, Stephen Rose, Kate Sinclair and Martin Lavin from the Queensland Institute of Medical Research in Brisbane, Australia, successfully used a special kind of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), called diffusion MRI, to examine the brains of people with A-T at various ages. They observed changes in the cerebellum and in projections from the cerebellum to … Read More