LONG TIME ADVISORS ELECTED TO THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES

Two of our long time scientific advisors have been elected to the prestigious National Academy of Sciences, one of the highest honors bestowed upon research scientists. Nathaniel Heintz, PhD Nathaniel (Nat) Heintz is the James and Marilyn Simons Professor and head of the Laboratory of Molecular Biology at The Rockefeller University in New York. Dr. … Read More

TESTING DRUGS TO PROTECT A-T BRAIN CELLS FROM DNA DAMAGE

Many drugs now taken by millions of people were discovered by high-throughput drug screening, a process in which scientists use robotics, data processing and control software, liquid handling devices and sensitive detectors to quickly perform millions of chemical tests until they find compounds that correct a biomolecular pathway that scientists believe is relevant to a … Read More

FAMILIES OF ATAXIA-TELANGIECTASIA PATIENTS WORLDWIDE LAUNCH NEW DATA PLATFORM TO EMPOWER RESEARCHERS

Families will contribute their data using on-line family questionnaires, whole-genome sequencing and other approaches, serving as a model for other diseases Families around the world who have children affected by ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) today announced the launch of the Global A-T Family Data Platform, through which health, genomic and potentially other types of data about their … Read More

GROWING A-T BRAIN CELLS IN A DISH

With funding from the A-T Children’s Project, the laboratory of Anthony Wynshaw-Boris, MD, PhD at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio will attempt to grow A-T brain cells in laboratory dishes to overcome the obstacle of not being able to access and study living brain cells from A-T patients. Dr. Wynshaw-Boris knows A-T well. … Read More

CAREER A-T RESEARCHER FOCUSES ON BRAIN

With a multi-year grant award from the A-T Children’s Project, Yossi Shiloh, PhD from Tel Aviv University in Israel will now turn much of his laboratory’s focus toward how the loss of the A-T protein causes brain cells to die in people with A-T. Dr. Shiloh first met children with A-T when he was a … Read More

ATW2015 INCLUDES SESSIONS ON NEUROGENERATION AND NON-TRADITIONAL ROLES OF THE A-T PROTEIN

Scientists and clinicians from around the world traveled to Beijing, China in October to share information at the 2015 A-T Workshop, a meeting co-sponsored by the A-T Children’s Project and held at the Capital Normal University. Beyond primarily discussing DNA repair roles of the ATM protein as in the past, this year’s meeting included sessions … Read More

CORRECTING CELL METABOLISM IN A-T

Scientists have known for a long time that skin and blood cells obtained from A-T patients do not survive as well as cells from healthy people, and recent discoveries have hinted that A-T cells, especially brain cells in A-T patients, may be dying because of defective cell metabolism. The A-T Children’s Project has therefore funded … Read More

EXPANDING MRI IMAGING FOR A-T BEYOND THE BRAIN TO LUNGS

Recently, Stephen Rose, Kate Sinclair and Martin Lavin from the Queensland Institute of Medical Research in Brisbane, Australia, successfully used a special kind of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), called diffusion MRI, to examine the brains of people with A-T at various ages. They observed changes in the cerebellum and in projections from the cerebellum to … Read More

SPINAL FLUID MAY HOLD CLUES FOR A-T

With funding from the A-T Children’s Project, Stefan Zielen and Ralf Schubert from the Goethe University in Frankfurt, Germany will examine spinal fluid from children and adolescents with A-T in an attempt to identify measurable indicators of oxidative stress, inflammation, or tissue breakdown that correlate with disease progression and severity. Spinal fluid, the clear fluid … Read More