UNDERSTANDING A-T THROUGH BRAIN IMAGING TECHNOLOGY

Using brain imaging technology, researchers at the University of Nottingham, United Kingdom, are working on a way to develop biomarkers for ataxia-telangiectasia that may enable and accelerate future clinical trials. Biomarkers are indirect measures of the underlying disease process that can help to assess whether or not drugs work. Drs. Robert Dineen and Dorothee Auer … Read More

A-TCP IN INTERNATIONAL EFFORT TO SHARE GENOMIC DATA

As a founding member of the Global Alliance for Genomics and Health (GA4GH), the A-T Children’s Project joins 148 organizations and institutions to meet the challenge of sharing genomic and clinical data to advance human health. Analyzing large amounts of genomic data will help researchers find treatments for both common and rare disorders. At the … Read More

NEW HANDBOOK: CARING FOR PEOPLE WITH A-T

The A-T Children’s Project is distributing a 16-page handbook called Caring for People with Ataxia-Telangiectasia. Topics include: Neurology Managing Lung Health Immunology Vaccine Schedules Cancer School Recommendations This handbook draws on the extensive experience of the clinicians who focus on A-T at The Johns Hopkins Hospital in Maryland, the hundreds of families who have been to … Read More

REMEMBER A-T KIDS IN YOUR YEAR-END GIVING

Dear friend of the A-T Children’s Project, As you plan your year-end charitable contributions, here are some reasons why I’m hoping you’ll include us in these final 24 hours: 1. With your help we’ve made real progress. To date, our greatest pay-off has come in extending the average lifespan of A-T kids by nearly eight years through … Read More

OPTIMIZING CANCER MANAGEMENT IN A-T

The A-T Children’s Project hosted a small, two-day workshop in Boston, Massachusetts entitled “Optimizing Cancer Management in A-T.” Clinical oncologists and immunologists from around the world gathered to discuss what is known, and what needs to be learned, about caring for patients with A-T who develop cancer. About 25 percent of children with A-T develop … Read More

IN MEMORY OF DAVID COX

David Cox, MD, PhD was the first director of the A-T Children’s Project’s Scientific Advisory Board and has remained an advisor for the past 20 years. He always gave generously of his time and expertise, whether attending meetings, reviewing grants, brainstorming ideas, or providing candid advice. His leadership and friendship helped guide our research program, … Read More

RESEARCHER DEVELOPING “A-T IN A DISH”

With a research grant from the A-TCP, Ronald Hart, PhD at Rutgers University in New Jersey will create induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) using blood samples taken from kids with A-T. Disease-specific iPSCs are often called “disease in a dish” models, because they allow scientists to study a disease using cells in culture, outside of … Read More